Which wines go well with turkey?
There are so many recipes on this site and so many of them are perfect for a dinner party. There's nothing quite like inviting a gaggle of close friends around for a slap-up turkey-based dinner So, you've got your menu planned, the desserts are sorted, the kids have been pacified and sent off to bed and your guests are expecting a feast beyond compare. One question remains, however: what kind of wine should you serve with dinner?

As any alcohol enthusiast knows, the beauty of turkey is that its subtle versatile flavour means that it will pair quite happily with most wines. So then the question is not which wine would pair best with your bird, but how are you going to prepare your turkey so that it pairs with your wine?
Turkey chilli con carne
Turkey chilli con carne
Turkey chilli con carne. Chilli is famously difficult to pair with wine and perhaps there is good reason for that. If your every instinct screams out for beer to accompany this rich, carbohydrate-laden treat, with its lashings of tortillas, sour cream and guacamole, well then you'd do worse than to listen to your body. A dark lager always seems to please a crowd. However, if you're determined to serve wine then you can still do very well with a nice, inexpensive Cabernet Sauvignon. This dish will overwhelm the subtleties of the palate, so it's best to stick with unpretentious big flavours that won't break the bank.
Turkey wild mushroom risotto
Turkey wild mushroom risotto
Turkey wild mushroom risotto. This dish is a creamy, unctuous affair that needs a wine to undercut its richness and bring out the delicacy of the meat. A solid Pinot Noir would be a good choice as its earthy flavours fragrant with red berry and truffles only enhance the air of sophistication. Indeed, it's best to select a wine dominated by its berry flavours – an Italian Barolo would also be a good match, as with the addition of its cherry and raspberry-based undertones, there is a lovely creamy hint of vanilla that will work wonders alongside the parmasan in the risotto.
Rigatoni & turkey meatballs
Rigatoni & turkey meatballs
Rigatoni & turkey meatballs. This is another time for red wine to shine. The key is to find the right balance of fruitiness and acidity to complete the tomato sauce. Tomatoes are acidic creatures and so the wine you serve must be similarly acidic to avoid the whole meal tasting flat. The important thing is to monitor your own preferences – the recipe calls for four cloves of garlic and so a lighter red wine will simply not be able to hold its own against the depth of flavour. A bottle Chianti is a classic and popular choice for good reason.
Stir-fried turkey with ginger
Stir-fried turkey with ginger
Stir-fried turkey with ginger. Asian-influenced cuisine can be a challenge to pair successfully with wine as the combination is not exactly traditional. However, there are some excellent choices that will compliment the fresh, light flavours in this dish. A California white wine in the vein of Viognier would do very well here, as it has an appealing sweetness that won't overwhelm the palate. Ordinarily, you would want to avoid anything too sweet but as the predominant flavours in this dish are from the soy sauce and the ginger, the combination will be refreshing, not cloying. Equally, a German Riesling would do exceptionally well, balancing sweetness and acidity in a pleasing way.
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Which wines go well with turkey?